Ahead
In Health

An inside look at the future of healthcare. In each episode, Jodie Lesh, Chief Transformation Officer at Kaiser Permanente, speaks with thought leaders and care providers who are helping shape how we all access care — from cutting-edge technologies, to designs and innovations that challenge the status quo. Ahead In Health delivers critical conversations about what state-of-the-art, equitable and ethical care can be.

Episodes

Testimonials

Fascinating discussions

Really candid conversations about where health care is headed – not only recommended for practioners, but also a great podcast for anyone interested in how care is transforming.

May 5, 2021
Onelouderash
Cutting edge and on point!

Insightful and informative podcast on the future of healthcare. Looking forward to hearing more

April 29, 2021
10380
I love it!

As a new KP employee I am proud to see my employer launch this illuminating podcast! Give it a listen!

April 23, 2021
edgaraguirre21
So excited for more episodes!

What an insightful first episode. So excited to hear more from Jodie and guests.

April 5, 2021
David McCuskey

The Science of Influence

with Andy Slavitt, Former Acting Administrator, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and Katy Milkman, Professor at The Wharton School

March 29, 2022

Changing people’s behavior is arguably the holy grail of medicine. To keep patients healthy, we ask them to do all sorts of things—come to their appointments, take their medications, get their vaccines. And beyond the clinic, we want them to exercise, eat healthily, get enough sleep. If we could collectively succeed at this kind of health-supporting behavior, we could solve a whole lot of the sickness and death that prescriptions and treatments alone can’t fix. But time and again, behavior change has proven incredibly hard to achieve. Why?

 

In this episode of Ahead in Health, Jodie Lesh digs into that question with Andy Slavitt, former head of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, author of the book “Preventable”; and Katy Milkman, behavioral economist at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, author of “How to Change”. Together, they explain many of the complex factors that drive our choices, from misinformation to the conditions we face in our everyday lives. 

Show Notes

Changing people’s behavior is arguably the holy grail of medicine. To keep patients healthy, we ask them to do all sorts of things—come to their appointments, take their medications, get their vaccines. And beyond the clinic, we want them to exercise, eat healthily, get enough sleep, limit alcohol, avoid smoking, and lately wear masks and take COVID-19 tests. If we could collectively succeed at this kind of health-supporting behavior, we could solve a whole lot of the sickness and death that prescriptions and treatments alone can’t fix. But time and again, behavior change has proven incredibly hard to achieve. Why?

 

In this episode of Ahead in Health, Jodie Lesh digs into that question with Andy Slavitt, former head of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, author of the book “Preventable,” and host of the “In the Bubble” podcast; and Katy Milkman, behavioral economist at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, author of “How to Change,” and host of the podcast “Choiceology.” Together, they explain many of the complex factors that drive our choices, from misinformation to the conditions we face in our everyday lives. And they identify how health care could tap into the growing insights of behavioral science to help all of us live to our healthiest potential.

***

Participants: Jodie Lesh, Andy Slavitt, Katy Milkman

COVID-19, Patient Data, and Personalized Health

with Ashwini Zenooz, MD, Commure and Paul Meyer, The Commons Project

March 22, 2022

We are awash in data. In health care, we (and our doctors) are constantly generating medical data from our health apps, connected devices, electronic health records, labs, images and treatment plans. Yet, very little of it is used or interpreted in a way that produces meaningful, personal insights… or helps us predict or prevent a problem before it starts.

In this episode of Ahead in Health, host Jodie Lesh talks to Dr. Ashwini Zenooz and Paul Meyer, two people who are revolutionizing how patient data is used, and modernizing an industry that still uses fax machines and CDs to convey crucial patient information. Together they discuss how to get our records into our hands – and phones – so that we can get seamless, personalized care anywhere. That future is closer than you think.

Show Notes

We are awash in data. In health care, we (and our doctors) are constantly generating medical data from our health apps, connected devices, electronic health records, labs, images and treatment plans. Yet, very little of it is used or interpreted in a way that produces meaningful, personal insights… or helps us predict or prevent a problem before it starts.

In this episode of Ahead in Health, host Jodie Lesh talks to Dr. Ashwini Zenooz and Paul Meyer, two people who are revolutionizing how patient data is used, and modernizing an industry that still uses fax machines and CDs to convey crucial patient information. Together they discuss how to get our records into our hands – and phones – so that we can get seamless, personalized care anywhere. That future is closer than you think.

Dr. Zenooz is the CEO of Commure, where she has created a platform that makes it easy for companies to build the next generation of healthcare applications. And Paul Meyer is founder and president of The Commons Project. They’re the ones behind the SMART Health Cards that make COVID-19 vaccination and testing records easy to access on our smartphones.

***
Participants: Jodie Lesh, Ashwini Zenooz, Paul Meyer   Note: Kaiser Permanente takes a robust, consistent, transparent data privacy approach to patient health data privacy. To learn more about our policies in this area, click here: Kaiser Permanente Data Security Policy

 

Caring for the Caregivers

with Kate Ryder, Maven Clinic

March 15, 2022

Our caregivers need their own support systems. Most caregivers are women, and over a third of women have skipped important doctor’s visits since the pandemic began. Part of that is overwhelm. But another part of it speaks to the fact that health care is not plugged into women’s lives in ways that make it easier for them to access specific services at key moments or phases of life.

In this episode of Ahead Health, host Jodie Lesh talks to Kate Ryder, founder and CEO of Maven Clinic. Maven’s mission as a digital health platform is to connect women with the providers and information they need to start and raise a family. They discuss the gaps in care that women still face, fusing digital and traditional care, and getting women accurate information in culturally sensitive ways.

Show Notes

Our caregivers need their own support systems. Most caregivers are women, and over a third of women have skipped important doctor’s visits since the pandemic began. Part of that is overwhelm. But another part of it speaks to the fact that health care is not plugged into women’s lives in ways that make it easier for them to access specific services at key moments or phases of life.

In this episode of Ahead Health, host Jodie Lesh talks to Kate Ryder, founder and CEO of Maven Clinic. Maven’s mission as a digital health platform is to connect women with the providers and information they need to start and raise a family. They discuss the gaps in care that women still face, fusing digital and traditional care, and getting women accurate information in culturally sensitive ways.

Digital Equity in the Shadow of Digital Health

with john a. powell, Othering & Belonging Institute at UC Berkeley and Abner Mason, SameSky Health

March 8, 2022

Virtual health care boomed in the COVID-19 pandemic, and it’s undoubtedly a huge part of the future of medicine. But is that good news for everyone? Underserved communities are at risk of being left even further behind as the most affordable, timely, convenient care increasingly happens online. Digital care actually has the potential to do the opposite—to improve access, personalize care, and reduce historic health inequities—but only if we design it right, and do so right now.

In this episode of Ahead in Health, host Jodie Lesh talks with professor john a. powell, director of the Othering & Belonging Institute at UC Berkeley, and Abner Mason, CEO of the patient engagement platform SameSky Health. They illuminate the steps needed to make health care inclusive, explaining how to use data to treat patients as individuals, how to design digital care to bridge mistrust, and what it means to truly belong.

Show Notes

Virtual health care boomed in the COVID-19 pandemic, and it’s undoubtedly a huge part of the future of medicine. But is that good news for everyone? Underserved communities are at risk of being left even further behind as the most affordable, timely, convenient care increasingly happens online. Digital care actually has the potential to do the opposite—to improve access, personalize care, and reduce historic health inequities—but only if we design it right, and do so right now.

In this episode of Ahead in Health, host Jodie Lesh talks with professor john a. powell, director of the Othering & Belonging Institute at UC Berkeley, and Abner Mason, CEO of the patient engagement platform SameSky Health. They illuminate the steps needed to make health care inclusive, explaining how to use data to treat patients as individuals, how to design digital care to bridge mistrust, and what it means to truly belong.

The Ever-Expanding Exam Room

with Daniel Kraft MD, XPRIZE Pandemic Alliance Task Force and Jordan Shlain MD, Private Medical

March 1, 2022

Health care has expanded beyond the clinic, the lab and the hospital. Today, more people than ever are using virtual health. It’s in our homes, parks and gyms. Even before COVID-19 accelerated these trends, there were more and more health apps, wearable technologies, and ways to message or video chat with your doctor. AI is being used for early detection and for decision making.

In this episode of Ahead in Health, host Jodie Lesh talks to Daniel Kraft M.D. and Jordan Shlain M.D., two noted health care innovators and futurists. They examine how the emergence of these new tools will reshape how people engage in their own health, how we build and design for trust and health care’s next big leap.

Show Notes

Health care has expanded beyond the clinic, the lab and the hospital. Today, more people than ever are using virtual health. It’s in our homes, parks and gyms. Even before COVID-19 accelerated these trends, there were more and more health apps, wearable technologies, and ways to message or video chat with your doctor. AI is being used for early detection and for decision making.

In this episode of Ahead in Health, host Jodie Lesh talks to Daniel Kraft M.D. and Jordan Shlain M.D., two noted health care innovators and futurists. They examine how the emergence of these new tools will reshape how people engage in their own health, how we build and design for trust and health care’s next big leap.

Season 2 Trailer

with Jodie Lesh (Host), Kaiser Permanente

February 22, 2022

We have an exciting line up of guests coming your way over the next several weeks. Listen here for a preview, you won’t want to miss it!

Learning and Leading in Crisis

with Leah Belsky, Coursera

May 6, 2021

As we have developed into a world living with COVID-19, an astounding amount of processes and procedures across sectors have been transformed. And as the situation evolves, we continue to live in a state of regular and massive change. So what does innovation mean in this world of rapid evolution? How can we take the shifts that this pandemic has induced — in markets, regulation and policy, digital transformation, health management, etc. — and learn from them in order to better motivate change and navigate our current moment? And how can we do this in favor of true revolutions in health, justice, and human flourishing.

Show Notes

In this episode of Ahead in Health, host Jodie Lesh is joined by Leah Belsky, Chief Enterprise Officer for Coursera, a global online learning platform that serves more than 70 million learners around the world.

Navigating crisis demands extraordinary leadership and new decision-making models. COVID-19 completely disrupted health care and forced providers such as Kaiser Permanente to rapidly innovate to keep consumers safe and connected.

These disruptions extended to the education space and transformed online learning. At Coursera, Belsky and her team had to make radical decisions about their business, shift ways they engage with their customers, and focus not just on business but also on the common good. When more than a billion students worldwide were forced into remote learning, Coursera decided to put their business model and profit-making plans on hold and temporarily offer their core products for free.

Belsky believes higher education has been transformed for good and that higher education will no longer be modeled on a full-time, in-person structure.

She and Lesh discuss what other aspects of society might have also been transformed by the pandemic, including the virtual opportunities that emerged from social distancing to level the playing field for those who live outside major cities who could not afford to move or travel for work or school.

Resiliency and flexibility have been essential skills for leaders during the pandemic. Lesh and Belsky discussed their struggles and how managers needed to strike a balance with their teams while being thoughtful and empathetic.

Learn more about Leah Belsky and follow @Coursera on Twitter. Follow Kaiser Permanente on Twitter https://twitter.com/aboutKP.

What’s the Future of AI in Healthcare?

with Dr. Rumman Chowdhury, Parity AI

April 22, 2021

Advanced technologies provide a unique ability to process data in efficient and smart ways, allowing healthcare providers and administrators to anticipate patients’ needs, design targeted preventative programs, innovate remedies, and remove burdensome tasks from these processes. In this episode, we look at the implications and opportunities for the use of AI in Healthcare. How can we streamline and verify quality data to ensure our AI decisions are instructive, ethical, and valuable? How can we demystify AI for increased transparency and utilization, both to improve performance and reduce doubt?

Show Notes

In this episode of Ahead in Health, Dr. Rumman Chowdhury of Parity A.I. joins moderator Tad Funahashi, MD, for a deep and wide-ranging conversation about how artificial intelligence could be used in health care for predictive analytics – and how it’s already being used to improve quality and efficiency in ways most patients don’t realize.

Today, image recognition can significantly help ophthalmologists and dermatologists diagnose. But someday soon, predictive analytics could give us ideas of what might happen to a patient’s health before it even happens. Kaiser Permanente’s electronic healthcare database has nearly 44 petabytes of data. It’s underused, but smart application of A.I. could unlock patterns that no physician could possibly see.
But there are real risks in this area. A.I. is an algorithm written by humans. As such, it is subject to bias. Drs. Funahashi and Chowdhury discuss the avoidance of biases in A.I. systems by more thoughtfully creating the algorithms and developing mitigation strategies when bias creeps in.
What protections can be built to avoid AI bias to ensure health care that is effective and equitable?

Learn more about Dr. Rumman Chowdhury and follow her on Twitter @ruchowdh. Learn more about Dr. Tad Funahasi and follow Kaiser Permanente on Twitter @aboutKP.

Digital Doctors (and Real Ones) in Your Backyard

with Marcus Osborne, Walmart Health

April 15, 2021

Health care is ripe for digital innovations to break down barriers and improve access and convenience. What technological bridges must we cross to build this future? How do we design the infrastructure today to ensure high quality care is low-cost and accessible, and can be delivered conveniently, in the right place at the right time? Beyond simple video calls with physicians, the future hinges upon our capacity improve connections between the clinic and home. By building viable modalities of virtual care that can address barriers such as transportation, mobility, and provider access, the future promises improved care for all.

Show Notes

In the United States, health care is ripe for digital innovations to break down barriers and improve access and convenience. Affordable, accessible care is more concept than reality for millions of Americans. Vemana and Osborne discuss a near-future world in which patients can drive just a few miles to a clinic to see a doctor and get x-rays, labs, and medications. Telehealth technology means they can have at-home test kits sent to them for follow-up. And the advent of AI-driven personal health devices opens to door to a world of preventative medicine where doctors have remote access to patient vitals, helping them play a proactive role.

In this “omnichannel” future, patients are no longer bound to a bricks-and-mortar healthcare setting versus digital technology. The ideal solution is one that integrates those channels and enables a consumer to create the experience in the moment that addresses their needs, including a way to integrate data across a very fractured health care system with structures that limit how a patient’s record can be shared out of network.

This technology-driven future leaves no one behind.

Learn more about Marcus Osborne and follow Walmart on Twitter @Walmart. Follow Kaiser Permanente on Twitter @aboutkp

Designing New Spaces of Care

with Brad Lukanic, CannonDesign

April 8, 2021

While virtual models of work and healthcare have taken precedent in the year of COVID-19, how people interact with the physical spaces of our world is ripe for innovation. How might we reimagine our built environment to meet the growing need for flexible work spaces and blended models of in-person and virtual interactions? What innovative partnerships are needed to create healthy ecosystems across rural and urban environments? The spaces we inhabit have a strong impact on our sense of safety, dignity, and identity. What is needed across businesses and healthcare to meet people where they are?

Show Notes

In this episode of Ahead in Health, host Jodie Lesh is joined by Don Orndoff and Brad Lukanic to discuss the use of places and spaces post-pandemic. What are the hallmarks of a well-designed, well-used building? Most of the time, we don’t even think about how we interact with the buildings we occupy. But COVID-19 taught us that events can trigger the need for innovation in how we use the medical offices, hospitals and other buildings that sit at the center of our communities.

Making spaces safe and more accessible requires a lot of intentionality and risk-taking. Design collaborations, like the one between Kaiser Permanente and CannonDesign, explore new ways of thinking about the complete ecosystem of a built environment. From surge planning for COVID to reimagining ambulatory spaces, the user experience will remain at the forefront of how we think about these traditionally built spaces. New technologies like app-based online check-in started as a member experience benefit, but then became a touch-free safety feature during a pandemic.

Throughout the conversation, Jodie Lesh and her guests discuss the relationship of buildings and technology. This includes efforts to raise the bar on environmental stewardship and the positive impact of becoming carbon neutral. Buildings are living organisms, and medical buildings also often sit at the heart of their communities. They have the potential to offer a fresh take on place-making and public programming, especially in highly urban and underserved areas.

Learn more about Brad Lukanic and follow CannonDesign @CannonDesign. Learn more about Don Orndoff and follow Kaiser Permanente on Twitter @aboutKP. Connect at ThoughtCAST@kp.org

Mental Health at Your Fingertips?

with Megan Jones Bell, Headspace

April 1, 2021

For decades health reformers have been pushing American medicine to adopt more proactive models of care — led in large part by Kaiser Permanente and its deep history in preventive medicine. Yet focusing healthcare conversations on maintaining health rather than managing sickness appears to be a constant challenge. Today consumer technologies are driving people to monitor, track and manage more and more elements of their lives, in pursuit of total health and wellbeing — from mental to physical health and all of their intersections. Are these digital tracking technologies then enabling our pursuit of wellness, or are there more systematic interventions on social determinants of health? What are the current models of health that point us towards an ideal future of integrated mental, physical, and social wellness, and how can we ensure that all people access these means to truly thrive?

Show Notes

In this episode of Ahead in Health, host Jodie Lesh and moderator Don Mordecai are joined by Megan Jones Bell, Chief Strategy and Science Officer at Headspace to discuss the all-important topic of mental health. Studies show that 1 in 5 American adults has a mental health condition, yet more than half struggle to seek or receive treatment – and that was before the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dr. Jones Bell describes how Headspace accelerated its connections with employers, teachers and national mental health providers in 2020. It created customized content around the coronavirus and for communities dealing with the fallout from racial injustice.

Technology is a tool, but it’s not a solution on its own. The next step is to get simple and affordable preventive care to the underserved communities that need it the most.

Headspace is not available to all Kaiser Permanente members and must be prescribed by a Kaiser Permanente Mental Health Clinician.

Please note that the free one-year subscription to Headspace Plus offered to furloughed or unemployed individuals in the U.S. and UK was valid for redemption until July 31, 2020.

Learn more about Dr. Megan Jones Bell and follow @Headspace. Learn more about Dr. Don Mordecai and follow Kaiser Permanente on Twitter @kpthrive.

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Meet the host

Jodie Lesh leads Kaiser Permanente’s Office of Transformation. Her team drives transformative system-wide innovation to create meaningful and sustainable change across KP. Jodie operates as a cross-functional orchestrator of complex, disruptive initiatives in support of KP’s strategic goals. She also leads the program’s delivery system strategy, executing capital projects in excess of $3 billion annually. Her work to reimagine the future of ambulatory care was featured in Fast Company’s 2016 World Changing Ideas issue, and “Health Hub Experience,” a book that Ms. Lesh penned with her team, was a Fast Company Innovation in Design finalist.

Contact

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Email us at aheadinhealth@kp.org